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Scholars Academic Journal of Pharmacy | Volume-13 | Issue-03
Monitoring Adverse Effects and Efficacy Associated with Short-Term Mefloquine Chemoprophylaxis: Experience of the Moroccan Level II Hospital in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Soufiane Ouelkabir, Chaimae Brahmi, Hamza Masca, Yasmina Tadlaoui
Published: March 23, 2024 | 128 96
DOI: DOI: 10.36347/sajp.2024.v13i03.003
Pages: 91-94
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Abstract
Malaria is transmitted by a parasite carried by certain species of Anopheles mosquitoes. The much-debated mefloquine was discovered in the 1970s by U.S. Army researchers. It is widely used to prevent and treat malaria. Our aim is to evaluate the different types of adverse reactions reported by military personnel at the Moroccan hospital in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. This is a prospective, cross-sectional study lasting three months. It was carried out using a three-part questionnaire (patient identification, vector protection used, adverse events reported, and whether or not a malaria attack had occurred). 67 military personnel. The majority of soldiers were men (97.28%), with 95% aged between 26 and 45. 100% of soldiers used mosquito nets and repellents. During the first month of chemoprophylaxis, 30% of soldiers had adverse reactions (60% had nightmares, 30% had asthenia, and 10% had somnolence). From the second month onwards, 50% of soldiers had adverse reactions (65% nightmares, 40% asthenia, 20% memory disorders, 10% somnolence, 5% headaches, and 5% insomnia). Towards the end of the third month, 53% of servicemen experienced adverse reactions (65% nightmares, 40% asthenia, 20% memory disorders, 10% somnolence, 5% headaches, 5% insomnia, and 3% anxiety). During these three months, only one case suffered a malaria attack. Mefloquine is an antimalarial drug commonly used to prevent and treat malaria. It is important to note that chemoprophylaxis alone does not guarantee 100% protection against malaria. Additional measures must therefore be taken, such as wearing long, light clothing, using insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets, and using repellents.